Resident Screening and Criminal Screening: Operational Resources

Overview

Housing providers have criteria that are used to screen potential residents, which may include criminal screening. While looking into the criminal background of a prospective resident is not illegal, per se, under the FHA, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has provided guidance noting that a criminal conviction screening policy can violate the FHA under the theory of disparate impact. Disparate impact occurs when policies, practices, rules or other systems that appear to be neutral create an adverse effect on a protected group. This can occur when a policy that is unintentionally discriminatory becomes discriminatory when implemented. Lack of clear guidance regarding disparate impact creates potential legal liability for housing providers. Below are resources to consider when developing and implementing criminal screening policies. The information provided is for informative purposes only - it is not to be used as legal or operational advice.

criminal screening

Member Resources

The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) recently issued Guidance discussing how a criminal conviction screening policy could violate the FHA under disparate impact theory. This white paper reviews the new HUD Guidance, relevant case law and offers best practices. (May 2016)

The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)'s guidance discussing how a criminal conviction screening policy could violate the FHA under disparate impact theory.

A company’s resident selection policies and screening criteria may vary depending on the property’s location, occupancy, delinquency goals and regulations that govern the screening process. However, there are some standard guidelines, market factors and requirements set forth by the owner or financial institution that also should be considered when establishing one’s screening policies and procedures. These guidelines are outlined in this best practice document.

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