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AMLI’s Residents Believe in Climate Change

Climate Change

AMLI’s 2018 survey indicated that 84 percent of respondents say they believe in global warming and/or climate change. This is significantly higher than the U.S. population at large.

AMLI Residential, a leading developer of sustainable, multifamily rental properties, announced the results of its second Sustainable Living Index – a survey of more than 4,200 U.S. AMLI apartment residents charting how their attitudes on environmentalism impact their choices on where to live.

The 2018 survey indicated that 84 percent of respondents say they believe in global warming and/or climate change. This is significantly higher than the U.S. population at large according to recent data from the Yale Program on Climate Change Communications. According to the Yale research, which was published in July 2017, 70 percent of Americans believe global warming is happening with only 50 percent expressing certainty that global warming is happening.

Although the majority of the AMLI survey respondents were Millennials (59 percent), belief in global warming was consistent across generations: roughly 89 percent of Gen Z, 88 percent of Millennials, 80 percent of Gen X and 74 percent of Baby Boomers surveyed believe in global warming and climate change.

“This survey shows apartment residents remain concerned about the environment and are committed to making lifestyle choices to reduce their carbon footprint,” Phil Tague, President of AMLI Residential, says. “The residents surveyed are mindful of how daily activities and where they live might impact their health as well as the environment. AMLI continues to invest in conscious and sustainable practices to make sure we deliver on what’s important to our residents. Our communities use land, water and energy more efficiently through clean-air initiatives and lifestyle amenities that enable residents to live more sustainably every day.”

The survey of AMLI residents was conducted in August 2018 at properties in Atlanta, Austin, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Houston, Seattle, Southern California and Southeast Florida. 

The survey also found that 83 percent of respondents believe that living in a green community is beneficial to their health and 59 percent of respondents would pay more to live in a green/sustainable community.